Materials to consider for a warming winter rug

Hard floors may look fabulous and provide practical flooring solutions all year round, but you may long for a softer feel underfoot in the colder months.

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This is where that long-time household favourite, the rug, comes into its own.

Fabulous at adding a splash of colour to a room, rugs are fantastically flexible (you can move them around as and when the mood takes you), charmingly characterful, and wonderfully warming when the weather turns chilly.

They look especially great on laminate flooring, which is available from stockists such as http://www.woodfloorwarehouse.co.uk/laminate-flooring/cheap-laminate-flooring.html.

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Suitable for most rooms in the house, rugs come in all shapes and sizes, but which material is best for your needs? Let’s look at the main choices:

Natural fibres

Natural fibres are those that come from natural sources. They are usually more durable than the alternatives, although they may cost a bit more.

Perhaps the most common and popular choice is wool. Very hardwearing, woollen rugs will put up with an awful lot of abuse from pets and children before they start to show signs of wear and tear.

Wool is very warm, holds its colours well, and will withstand spillages – although you will need to get your rug professionally cleaned every once in a while to keep it looking its best.

According to Rug Chick, wool is also naturally fire- and spill-resistant.

Another natural fibre, cotton rugs are usually flat weaved or braided and have the advantage over wool in that they can often be machine washed. Cheaper than wool, a cotton rug will suit a family on a tighter budget.

Natural fibre rugs also come in silk. These are not very practical, but would look fantastic in a bedroom. Jute and sisal are made from plant materials and are both very hardwearing; however, they tend to be a little coarse underfoot and are perhaps best kept for high traffic areas, such as hallways.

Synthetic fibres

Usually machine-made, synthetic rugs are usually cheaper than natural fibre ones and come in a range of materials, including nylon, polyester and polypropylene.

Both nylon and polyester are very strong and are therefore ideal for places with lots of coming and going and will last a long time; however, nylon is often prone to fading, while polyester is hard to dye and patterns and colours will therefore be limited.